lizgreeentattoo:

Wanting to tattoo some spooky babes!

Reblogged from inkpusher
seiya234:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

This is so fucking badass I can’t even

seiya234:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

This is so fucking badass I can’t even

Reblogged from Born to be Brave
sbosma:

A drawing running in today’s edition of The Washington Post, highlighting this weekend’s Awesome Con. The brief mentioned that this year’s Awesome Con was expected to break the Guinness World Record for most superhero cosplayers in one convention. 
I had a lot of fun figuring out which superheroes to put in, and how to do it. Thanks to AD Allie Ghaman.

sbosma:

A drawing running in today’s edition of The Washington Post, highlighting this weekend’s Awesome Con. The brief mentioned that this year’s Awesome Con was expected to break the Guinness World Record for most superhero cosplayers in one convention. 

I had a lot of fun figuring out which superheroes to put in, and how to do it. Thanks to AD Allie Ghaman.

Reblogged from SAM BOSMA
drewweing:

Forgotten secrets, and pure lard, in today’s page of Margo Maloo. (via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

drewweing:

Forgotten secrets, and pure lard, in today’s page of Margo Maloo.
(via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

Reblogged from Dungeon Crawl
erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

Reblogged from Erik Kwakkel

artforadults:

the triumph by alfonso elola

Tags: inspiration
bulanbek:

Slow-mo dragonfly nymph labium (mask) in action. The actual strike only takes a fraction of a second. The labium is hydraulically activated by drawing in water, sealing the anal vent, and compressing the abdominal muscles. If the same action is performed with the anus open, the nymph will instead shoot forward on jet-propulsion, which it can use to escape predators or rapidly close in on prey.

bulanbek:

Slow-mo dragonfly nymph labium (mask) in action. The actual strike only takes a fraction of a second. The labium is hydraulically activated by drawing in water, sealing the anal vent, and compressing the abdominal muscles. If the same action is performed with the anus open, the nymph will instead shoot forward on jet-propulsion, which it can use to escape predators or rapidly close in on prey.

Reblogged from bulan made these gifs
Reblogged from G I N G E R L A N D
thomasbarwick:

Portrait of Sansa Stark, her off Game of Thrones.

thomasbarwick:

Portrait of Sansa Stark, her off Game of Thrones.

Reblogged from T O M

jilliantamaki:

Selected images from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas, by Jules Verne. Published by the Folio Society. You can buy it here.

One of the best part of being an illustrator, in my humble opinion, is reading books that you might not have otherwise. Given the modern-day representations, I think I was expecting some sort of pulpy adventure story (quite an anachronistic notion, given the book was written in 1869). In reality, it’s a scientific travelogue: very thoroughly observed and researched. There are also some very beautiful descriptions of foreign lands that, when you think about it, are no closer to most of us now than they were in 1869.

__

Other Folio Society books I have illustrated:

Goblin Market and Selected Poems - Christina Rosetti

Irish Myths and Legends - Lady Gregory

Reblogged from Jillian Tamaki