palneaux:

Frank Godwin, published in a 1921 edition of The Blue Fairy Book for “The Story of Prince Ahmed and the Fairy Paribanou.”

palneaux:

Frank Godwin, published in a 1921 edition of The Blue Fairy Book for “The Story of Prince Ahmed and the Fairy Paribanou.”

Reblogged from ataraxy
clawfingers:

an illustration toward a multi-part assignment around Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky poem.

clawfingers:

an illustration toward a multi-part assignment around Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky poem.

Reblogged from
wolfhard:

My favourite thing about being a cartoonist is that I can draw anything. As an example I drew the hardest things I could think of, a spiral staircase, a bike, and a horse. Like, that staircase is real hinky but I bet it could work if I drew someone walking down it.
I saw this knowing that there are obviously levels, like, there’s Jillian Tamaki who is a remarkable cartoonist but also makes work like this, which is absolutely incredible and beautiful and inspiring.
Haha but still I think that anyone who’s smart, creative and funny can be a cartoonist. I think that’s neat. I think … that cartooning … might … be … easy.

wolfhard:

My favourite thing about being a cartoonist is that I can draw anything. As an example I drew the hardest things I could think of, a spiral staircase, a bike, and a horse. Like, that staircase is real hinky but I bet it could work if I drew someone walking down it.

I saw this knowing that there are obviously levels, like, there’s Jillian Tamaki who is a remarkable cartoonist but also makes work like this, which is absolutely incredible and beautiful and inspiring.

Haha but still I think that anyone who’s smart, creative and funny can be a cartoonist. I think that’s neat. I think … that cartooning … might … be … easy.

Reblogged from Steve Wolfhard

tisztaszegyen:

Xiu XIu and Deehoof - Disorder (Joy Division cover)

Reblogged from JKSFZ
monicatramos:

I got to do an illustration for the New York Times Sunday Review about Diversity In Kid’s Books. Thanks to Alexandra Zsigmond!

monicatramos:

I got to do an illustration for the New York Times Sunday Review about Diversity In Kid’s Books. Thanks to Alexandra Zsigmond!

Reblogged from MONICA RAMOS

lizgreeentattoo:

Wanting to tattoo some spooky babes!

Reblogged from inkpusher
seiya234:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

This is so fucking badass I can’t even

seiya234:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

This is so fucking badass I can’t even

Reblogged from Born to be Brave
sbosma:

A drawing running in today’s edition of The Washington Post, highlighting this weekend’s Awesome Con. The brief mentioned that this year’s Awesome Con was expected to break the Guinness World Record for most superhero cosplayers in one convention. 
I had a lot of fun figuring out which superheroes to put in, and how to do it. Thanks to AD Allie Ghaman.

sbosma:

A drawing running in today’s edition of The Washington Post, highlighting this weekend’s Awesome Con. The brief mentioned that this year’s Awesome Con was expected to break the Guinness World Record for most superhero cosplayers in one convention. 

I had a lot of fun figuring out which superheroes to put in, and how to do it. Thanks to AD Allie Ghaman.

Reblogged from SAM BOSMA
drewweing:

Forgotten secrets, and pure lard, in today’s page of Margo Maloo. (via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

drewweing:

Forgotten secrets, and pure lard, in today’s page of Margo Maloo.
(via The Creepy Casefiles of Margo Maloo | Updates Tuesdays and Thursdays)

Reblogged from Dungeon Crawl
erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

Reblogged from Erik Kwakkel